Company no dating policy

If, however, they say no, then you will have to make a decision about whether you can continue in your current employment, which is always easier to make before you are terminated for violating company policy.

If your company does not have a moonlighting policy, then it may not be a problem for you to have a second job, but to be safe, you might want to consult a supervisor or your company's HR department.

Even if you were not employed at will, violating your employer's policy would be sufficient "just cause" grounds for termination or discipline.

(However, if you live in a state with a law restricting an employer's ability to fire you for "lawful conduct outside of work," that law might offer some protection.

Voluntarily disclosing the information up front will make it easier for you and your company to address any potential problems that could result, such as issues related to one employee's authority over another, promotion/advancement which could lead to supervision issues, and what happens if you break up.

You might think that who you hang out with when you're off the job is not the boss's business, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently upheld a very restrictive anti-fraternization policy, which made it against the rules for a security company's guards to "fraternize on duty or off duty, date, or become overly friendly with the client's employees or with co-employees." While the policy was ostensibly enacted for safety and security purposes, its chilling effect goes much further.

While generally these policies are designed to prevent you from dating someone in your chain-of-command, be sure that you do not violate your company's policy, which may be more strict than the most common policies.

Some companies now ask that you notify the company before dating a coworker, and may require that you sign a "relationship contract," indicating that the relationship is voluntary and consensual.

Additional information can also be found at the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Blogger's FAQ on Labor Law.Therefore, each different off-duty conduct issue must be looked at carefully. A co-worker is sending me harassing emails through his personal account while off-duty. So I tried applying to a different company but they wouldn't hire me because my husband works for the competitor. The answer to this seemingly simple question is: it depends.This page provides answers to many common questions about off-duty conduct, but for issues with off-duty conduct it is always advisable to have a local attorney look at your case. I recently came out as gay and when my employer found out I was fired. It depends on the activity involved, and whether that activity has any legal protection under your state's laws.So if the reason for your termination is not illegal under the laws of your state, then yes, your employer can fire you for what you do on your own time, outside of work. A new trend is increasingly taking hold, where companies looking to reduce their health care costs have established not just a "no smoking" policy, but a "no smokers" policy.

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These companies not only refuse to hire smokers, but some are even taking the drastic step of terminating current employees who smoke.Generally, an employer can fire you for having a personal website or blog that it deems inappropriate, with very limited exceptions.

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